F. Malcolm Benitz Page last modified:
Missing image.

F/O F.M. Benitz - “Benny”
PG-78, Sulmona, Italy
March 1943
(Source: C. Le Bas)

Missing image.

P.G. 78, Fonte d'Amore, 1943
Rows of POW barracks.
View west towards Sulmona.
(Source: Liceo E. Fermi, Sulmona)

Frank Malcolm Benitz, DFC
P.O.W.
Jan.–Sep., 1943

During WW-II, Malcolm enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a volunteer (RCAF-VR), becoming a pilot.  He was with RAF No.104 Bomber Squadron when, on 27 November 1942, he was forced to ditch in the Mediterranean short of Malta.

Ten days later, on 5 December, he was rescued by an Italian hospital ship and taken prisoner to Tripoli (Libya).  He was held in Libya about twenty days before being sent by submarine to Taranto, a port on the south coast of Italy.  (See the Capture page for a more detailed account of his rescue and time in Libya.)

———‹•›———

The POW camp in Fonte d'Amore (P.G. 78) still exists (2015) and many barracks (huts) are still there but not the one Malcolm "resided" in.  Some of the barracks can be visited.  See below the photos of our visit to P.G. 78 in 2004.  For much more about both camps, search the web for:

"P.G. 75 Torre Tresca Bari"
"P.G. 78 Fonte d'Amore Sulmona"
"Freedom Trail da Sulmona"
"Il Sentiero della Libertà"

P.G. 75 – Torre Tresca, Bari – January & February, 1943:

Malcolm was sent from Taranto to a transit camp, P.G. 75 (Prigione di Guerra / Prison of War), in Torre Tresca, a village immediately west of Bari.  While there, he met F/O "Bunny" Donnald W. McLarty, from Temperley (a suburb of Buenos Aires).

 Recently captured, Malcolm needed clothes.  In a letter to his family on January 5, 1943 (see full text below), he wrote: "I'm short of clothing.  If you can send me a good thick sleeved sweater and socks I can use them. Also some underpants."  Apparently resolved fairly quickly.  From the compiled letters below (date unknown): "Red Cross issue of clothing arrived this week.  Flannel shirts, socks underwear and battle dress, very much needed, so am warmly clad now...."

In an undated (presumably later) letter to the family, he wrote: "We have had several Canadian Red Cross parcels here since we arrived.  Four of us are in a syndicate, and share ours.  We have a canteen here and can buy small articles such as tooth paste, note books, razor blades etc. and every now and again they get dried figs in.  We make a marvellous pudding of grated bread, chopped figs, and an orange.  Heated up it is very good! We were two weeks in quarantine on arrival and lived in a separate block."

Being in quarantine, suggests Malcolm was still at P.G. 75 when he wrote the above.

P.G. 78 – Fonte d'Amore, Sulmona – March to September, 1943:

In early March, 1943, he and Donnald McLarty were in a group of about ten POWs that were transferred to P.G. 78, a larger POW camp in Fonte d'Amore, a village at the foot of the Morrone mountains, near Sulmona, 160 km. (100 miles) east of Rome.  They remained interned there until Italy capitulated, September 8, 1943.

Missing image.

P.G. 78 – Sulmona – March 1943
R.J.F.Sherk* - E.R.Patrick* - C.E.L.Hare - E.H.Hodgson* - D.W.McLarty* - C.D.R.Chapell
F.M.Benitz* - A.G.Markle* - E.R.Derrick - S.G.Brook*
* - confirmed got away after Italy capitulated
(Source: C.Meunier & P.Benitz)

Boredom and the sense of isolation was constant.  In his letters Malcolm repeatedly asks for news from home, snap-shots of family, and familiar food.  The prisoners were supplied a lot of pasta which they then had to prepare themselves (pasta cooked by Brits?!).

A fellow POW, Doug R. Thomson (F/Lt. C-3555 RCAF), wrote to Malcolm after the war (on Jan 21st, 1970) regarding a diary he was sending: "It is my hope that from this little book you will be able to recall many of the pleasent memories. For me it has recalled the killing of flies, the ice cold mountain water shower and VINO CHIANTI, the only brew we lesser officers could afford. (Lousy wasn't it) and how does your wife cook macaroni??? Remember some of the things we did to it?? Do you remember eating Occupus??? Rubbery blody stuff - what?"

Malcolm's wounded leg was still weak which prevented him from playing sports.  Instead he read (the POWs had a small library) and played cards; he claimed his bridge game had greatly improved (see his letters to Margaret Douglas below).

Tunnel:

Malcolm, being physically small, was one of the lead diggers of an escape tunnel at P.G. 78.  They had finished digging the tunnel but rain delayed the planned escape.  The delay allowed disaster to strike, in the form of a mule drawn honey-wagon.  The roof collapsed under its weight and the wagon fell into the tunnel.  Luckily there was no one in the tunnel at the time.

Malcolm did not mention any punishment by the Italian guards; however, punishment likely consisted of “a finger wagging on the part of the captors, short rations, and no sports. ... inmates sporadically caught in the act were given 28 days solitary confinement.” (D'Arcy Marsh, "Routes to Freedom", a magazine article published in Canada, ca.1970, about escaped POWs, including Ray Sherk & Donnald McLarty - see photo above.)

Though key to digging the tunnel, Malcolm was not planning to escape, aware his wounded leg was still weak and would slow him down and any who were escaping with him.

[Notes: (i) “honey-wagon” = sewage-tanker.  (ii) Three tunnels were dug at P.G. 78, none succeeded.  John Esmond Fox recounts them in his book "Spaghetti & Barbed Wire", chapter 6.]

Letters received & sent:

Included here is some of Malcolm's correspondence while a POW.  All correspondence to him had to include in the addres his POW number: PM-3450.

Father – Willie Benitz

Willie's correspondence with the various British and Canadian authorities is available via the Mail button above.  Willie twice tried to have Malcolm sent home, after he was wounded and after he escaped from POW camp.  Willie was refused, the first time by the R.C.A.F., the second by Malcolm.

No pic.

Willie to Malcolm – at P.G. 75
1 March, 1943

(Source: F.M. Benitz)

J.15035-(F.M.BENITZ) FLYING-OFFICER-BRITISH
PRISONER-OF-WAR-PM3450 ITALY

La California, 1/3/43

My dear Malcolm,
  So you are safe and sound in Italy, we were more than worried that you were missing. Moll cabled you sent card and address. I wonder how to send letters to you, and will try several ways; tell me which you get first. Will also try to get some money to you; cabled to you two days ago telling you we are all well.

  Family is up at the Nogales. Uncle Stanley died from heart attack in Rio fortnight ago. Bernice gone up to stay with Katie. [ERASURE] Hope to sell last years crop well now. Tell us if you get parcels through Red X & who are the friends you are with. Keith, Corina & family are going back to B.A. he has been offered a big job. Seaton, Campbell's brother in law is here in the office. Hope you stay good and are well treated. Love from us all. DAD.

Posted through kindness of Geo. Ward. U.S.A.

-------------
Estancia La California – near Las Rosas, Santa Fé, Arg.
Moll Hale – Eileen's sister, in London
Rio – Rio de Janeiro
Los Nogales – hostel in Los Cocos, Córdoba, Arg.
Stanley Jeans – Katie's husband
Katie & Bernice – Willie's sisters
Corina – Malcolm's older sister
Keith Pryor – Corina's husband (working at La California)
B.A. – Buenos Aires
George Ward – fraternity brother of Willie's

Compilations of Malcolm's Letters to family

Malcolm's letters to family were retyped making several carbon copies for distribution to other family members.  Unsure his letters were getting through, Malcolm repeated much the same news and requests to several people.

No pic.

Cards and letter
received by Willie & Eileen

at "La California"
Likely typed by Eileen
(Source: J. Watt/Baggott)

Cards and letter received from Malcolm.

J-15035 F/O F.M.Benitz
British Prisoner of War.
Campo P.G. 75.
P.M. 3450.  ITALY.

Jan. 1st. 1943.

How are you?  Am prisoner of war.  Was picked up by Italian Hospital ship Dec. 5th.  Am very fit and doing O.K.  Am longing for news of the family.  Letters reach here fairly quickly.  Can you send me woollen socks, sweater and a food parcel now and again if possible.  Also notify family of my address.  Tons of love and hugs to you and family.

Jan. 5th. 1943.

Dear Family: How are you all?  I'm longing for news of you all.  Moyra, very many happy returns of today.  I what you will be doing at home?  I'm afraid my Christmas letters will not reach you.  am very fit and doing alright.  Moll and Binks, can you get in touch with the Red Cross and find out what you can send and send me all you can in food and cigarettes and arrange with Dad about my account?  I'm short of clothing.  If you can send me a good thick sleeved sweater and socks I can use them.  Also some underpants.  I was picked up in the sea with my crew by an Italian Hospital ship after we had been floating and drifting 10 days – so we were glad of some food and water! They treated us very well on the ship.  My navigator P/O Cope, a grand fellow, was killed when we force-landed in the drink.  The rest of us were O.K.  I got a slight cut on my forehead.  I'm with a Sout African pilot, Peter Cambell who was at Wye with Frankie.  Also F/O D.W. McLarty is here,from Temperley.  He joined the R.C.A.F. in the batch after our crowd.  I wonder how things have been going with you at home.  How was the harvest?  How are the stock and horses?  Can you send snaps of you all, in different batches.  This means you too, Moll.  I had been counting on spending Chrismas with you and Binks.  We'll celebrate it at a later date.  You'll wonder where I was then.  How is the *horse that you lent Jim Traill for the tournaments, Dad?  I wonder how the others turned out.  Write here regularly.  Tons of love and hugs.
* The Pony's name was "Submarino" maybe he was transferred from Hospital ship to a sub. or is there a place called Submarino  Wonder if Italian Hosp. Ships are acting as supply ships to their subs?

Jan. 9tM. 1943.

Dear Family: How are you all?  I hope you are receiving these cards.  I wrote a letter on Jan. 5th.  I wonder what you all did over Xmas.  I'm very fit and doing all right.  Several of us have been together for some time and we have a cheery time.  You can send clothes, food and cigarettes through Red Cross addressed to me.  I can use them!  Socks and sweater.  Tons of love.

Jan. 18th. 1943.

Longing for news of you all.  Hope my letters are all reaching you.  I'm very fit and doing all right.  Many happy returns fo the 13th Mum!  A trifle late I'm afraid.  What is Charles doing now?  I wonder if he is going to a University at home?  What is Moyra doing?  Am longing for snaps of you all.  First snow this wee.  Very little.  Tons of love and big hugs to all.

No pic.

Synopsis of Malcolm's Letters
from Jan. 1st to Feb. 11th

Typist unknown
(Source: J. Bell)

SYNOPSIS OF MALCOLM’S LETTERS FROM Jan. 1st. TO Feb. 11th.

How are you all?  Am prisoner of War.  Am fit and doing O.K.  Can you send me woollen socks, sweater and a food parcel now and again, if possible?  I was picked up in the sea with my crew by an Italian Hospital ship after we had been floating and drifting 10 days – so we were glad to get some food and water! They treated us very well on the ship.  My navigator, P/O Cope, a grand fellow, was killed when we force-landed in the drink.  The rest of us were O.K.  I got a slight cut on my forehead.  I’m with a South African pilot, Peter Cambell, who was at Wye with Frankie [Bell], also F/O McLarty is here from Temperley.  He joined the R.C.A.F. in the batch after our crowd.  I wonder what you have been doing at home.  Can you send snaps of you all, in different batches.  This means you too, Moll [Hale].  I had been counting on spending Christmas with you and Binks [Lacey].  We’ll have to celebrate it at a later date.  You’ll wonder where I was then.  How is the horse* that you sent Jim Traill for the tournaments Dad?  Write here often.
[* horse was named “Submarino” – Malcolm was hinting at how he was transported to Italy.]

Several of us have been together for some time and we have a cheery time.  You can send clothes, food and cigarettes through the Red Cross addressed to me.  I can use them! First snow this week, tho’ very little.

Red Cross issue of clothing arrived this week.  Flannel shirts, socks underwear and battle dress, very much needed, so am warmly clad now.  People are getting letters in under a month from England.  Longing for news of you all.

By now I’m hoping that you will have received the first of my letters to you.  In another six weeks I’m hoping to have word from you Moll, and news of the family.  How is everybody?  My goodness, what I wouldn’t give for some of Josefa’s bifes! [cook at La California, bifes = steaks] Am feeling very fit, having completely made up for what I lost on the 10 days voyage in the rubber dinghy.  My leg is O.K. and I hope to be able to play rugger in another few months.  They made a ground here and play every day.  Well, it won’t be long now before we’ll all be together again.

I have quite a lot of other pilots and army officers here for company and we manage to occupy our time pretty well.  We have had several Canadian Red Cross parcels here since we arrived.  Four of us are in a syndicate, and share ours.  We have a canteen here and can buy small articles such as tooth paste, note books, razor blades etc. and every now and again they get dried figs in.  We make a marvellous pudding of grated bread, chopped figs, and an orange.  Heated up it is very good! We were two weeks in quarantine on arrival and lived in a separate block.  Now we are with the other officers and the whole set-up is better.  Did I tell you that there is a fellow here who was at school with me at Amesbury, also a pilot who was flying with Mike Le Bas, when he was shot down.  I do quite a lot of reading and am playing quite a lot of bridge, so you can expect some improvement in my game when I come home!

It was marvellous getting your cable.  I hope you will have received my reply quicker.  I’m very glad you knew I was a prisoner so soon.  I wonder how you first heard?  Are these cables very expensive from B.A? [Buenos Aires]  If not, could you send one periodically?  I’m longing for news from you all.  I’m very fit, getting sufficient to eat, so there’s no need to worry.  We get Red Cross parcels here, and believe me they are a real boon!! Tell May [Watt] that an old friend of hers is here, Taylor in the Marines.  He travelled home with Jim [Traill] and Tony [Traill].  They’ve made a soccer ground here and have games every afternoon, also rugger, which is grand.

Margaret Cooper (formerly: Douglas)

Malcolm was "sweet" on Margaret Douglas and wrote to her often.  Members of the same "camp" social group in Argentina, she was from estancia “La Panchita” (in Córdoba), west of Malcolm at "La California".  When Malcolm escaped, one of the very first things he did after reaching the Allied lines was to buy her stockings (see his escape diary, 18 Oct. 1943).  Almost seventy years later, in October 2011, she still remembered "those black stockings"!  She was in the WRNS and, unknown to him, worked at Bletchly Park monitoring German U-Boats.  She very kindly provided us some of his letters, which we show here.  She was 98 years old when she died July 18, 2016, in Canada.

No pic.

Malcolm to Margaret
6 Dec 1942

(Source: Margaret Cooper)

Was taken Prisoner of War yesterday with crew after floating around Meditarranean in dinghy for 10 days!  Picked up by Italian Hospital Ship  I'll send you my address when I reach a P.O.W. Camp.  I've written to Moll.  Please drop a line to the family – Am O.K.  Longing for some news of you.  Hope you are well.
   Tons love. Malcolm

No pic.

Malcolm to Margaret
13 Jan. 1943

(Source: Margaret Cooper)

Jan. 13th 1943.  Address: F/O F.M. Benitz.  P.G 75. P.M. 3450 Italy.
My dear Margaret;  I expect you will be a bit surprised to see where this comes from & just a bit shaken to see who it’s from!  Still wonder never cease!  By the way, you owe me innumerable letters!  I haven’t heard from you for ages and am longing to hear how you are getting on.  I’ve been in the bag since Dec. 5th when an Italian Hospital Ship picked my crew & me up in the Med.  We had been drifting for 10 days after force-landing in the sea and were pretty done-in by then as we had no food or water with us.  They treated us very well on the ship feeding us nothing but liquids the first day, in small quantities.  Unfortunately my navigator was killed when we landed in the sea.  The rest of us got away with a few scratches.  I wonder where you spent Christmas & the new Year? How is Billy getting on in the army?  Have you seen Sholto & his wife lately?  I wonder where Eve & the kids are living now?  If you see Joe Webster will you thank her for the letter she wrote me & tell her I’m sorry I didn’t answer it.  I wonder what you doing these days & whether you like your present job?  I expect you got I several parties during Christmas & New Year.  Caramba!  I had been hoping to see you then as I had been pretty busy when I was taken prisoner & due to go over your way.  However it wont be long before it is all over & I’ll be making a bee-line back to see you.  Hoping to get a long letter from you soon!  Tons of love & a hug.  Malcolm.
---------------
Billy –
Sholto Douglas – Margaret's brother
Eve –
Jo Webster – from Monte Buey, Cba., Arg.

No pic.

Malcolm to Margaret
27 Jan. 1943

(Source: Margaret Cooper)

Jan 27th 1943.  My dear Margaret;  How goes everything with you? I wonder whether you have received my last letter.  I’m longing to hear from you and to hear what you have been doing these past months.  I have been a prisoner for over a month and a half now, and am doing all right here, having a number of congenial companions, enough to eat, and reasonably good living conditions.  We have a small library here and I do quite a lot of reading.  We play a lot of bridge, so by the time I see you again I’ll be a second Culbertson!  There is a fellow here F/O John McLarty from B.A. who was in the crowd after us in our training.  I was very surprised to see him here!  Also a fellow who was shot down when flying behind Mike Le Bas!  There is also a friend for mine from Prep School here.  We manage to get exercise by walking here.  They have made a football ground & had a rugger game yesterday.  My leg still prevents me from running like I used to, but in a few months it should be all right.  They told me in Palestine that it would take a year to mend properly.  So, I guess it is a case of ‘paciencia’!  Some clothing has arrived from the Red Cross, underclothing shirts & socks which is a great help.  Be sure & write & tell me all your news, letters arrive here quite quickly.  I'm looking forward to hearing what you’ve been up to.  Hope you’re behaving & not splicing the main brace too much!  Tons love & a hug.  Malcolm.
--------------
Mike Le Bas – from Rosario (Arg.); he later married Malcolm's younger sister.

No pic.

Malcolm to Margaret
15 Feb. 1943

(Source: Margaret Cooper)

Feb 15th  Dear Margaret:  I’m hoping that by this time you’ll have had a letter from me here, and it should not be very long before I hear from you.  I hope all is going well with you.  I’m very fit and doing O.K.  We’ve had several grand sunny days lately so it looks as though we’ll soon be in Spring.  Lt. Taylor & F/O McLarty from B.A. here too.   What is your rank these days?  Love.  Malcolm

No pic.

Malcolm to Margaret
1 Mar 1943

(Source: Margaret Cooper)

1 Mar 1943

How are you?  I received first letter from Dad last week. Nov. 15 mailed by Moll on Feb 11. [ERASURE] Had a cheery time ove Easter here; it was also my birthday.  I wonder whether you had any leave then?  Have heard you've been having good weather lately. Everything very green here now.  Hoping this finds you well. Love. MB.

No pic.

Malcolm to Margaret
11 Mar. 1943

(Source: Margaret Cooper)

11 Mar 1943

Dear Margaret:  How goes everything with you? I came to this camp a few days ago with ten other Canadians.  It is a larger camp & the set-up is better than the last.  I met a friend here who has been in the bag since July [1942]; also others from our old crowd.  Parcels & mail arrive here fairly quickly so I’m looking forward to a letter from you soon.  I’ll send a snap next month.  Hope you’re well.  Love   M.B.

No pic.

Malcolm to Margaret
1x Apr. 1943

Received 24 May, 1943
(Source: Margaret Cooper)

1x Apr 1943

Dear Margaret:  Here is the photo I promised to send you.  I hope you receive it O.K.  I had it taken soon after I came to this camp.  [No doubt the same photo shown at the top of this web page.]  I haven’t had any letters yet, but hope they won’t be long in coming now.  How does everything with you?  I’m longing to hear what you are doing these days.  I hope you are in a good spot, where there is plenty to do.  I wish I could be there with you.  Caramba!  But it won’t be long now!  I’ve been addressing letters to the P.O. Box in Howick Place you gave me last year, but will send this via R.P. [River Plate] House in case you have altered it.  Well, here things go on much the same, though the weather has been very changeable lately.  From warm and sunny it changed to almost a blizzard this week & we had rain & some snow.  It cleared yesterday & has been grand today.  The mountains all around here had quite a fall of snow on them & are a grand sight.  What news have you had from home lately?  I’m completely out of touch with everyone now, as the last letter I had from home was dated Aug. 17th!  We got a large consignment of food in bulk from the Argentine R. Cross & have been eating it this week.  Very good it is too!  Honey, sugar, jam, cheese & Swift’s & Anglo’s canned meat.  Also some dried fruit which we had stewed tonight, some of Uncle Graham’s products, no doubt!  The O.R.s [Other Ranks] put on a very good performance of the play “George & Margaret” this week.  Their get-up & scenery is marvellous considering what they have to work with.  Well, Margaret, I hope this snap reaches you, & if you can find the time, I’d like to hear from you as often as you care to write.  Tons love.  Malcolm
----------------
Uncle Graham – E. Graham Paul, married to Nena Benitz, farmed fruit in San Rafael, Mendoza, Arg.

  No pic.

Margaret to Malcolm
21 June 1943

(Source: Margaret Cooper)

My Dear Malcolm.  You are more than ever in my thoughts, so much seems to be happening and one knows so little, I do so wonder how you are & if the Red + parcels are arriving.  I'm hoping for a letter any day now & I seriously hope you will have had some of my letters.  I think the last time I wrote I was on leave Unfortunately, the weather was wretched most of the time, so we decided to come back, I was awfully fed up not getting any surfing as I had heard such a lot about it.  Billy came up last week on leave, I got some bear & a picnic lunch which we had up on the hill, it realy was lovely & I think he enjoyed the change.  Now he is in an A.C.T.U. in the Royal Artillery which he seems very pleased about.  I've been playing quite a bit of tennis lately which is realy marvelious as I always long for excercise.  I think I'll be on the move again soon, its rather a pleasant surprise, as it will mean a commission & a grand job, but I go for another interview tomorow, so we shall know more then.  I had two long letters from Mum this morning, they have just left P. del E.  I think Evelyn is going to share a small house with Dorothy Philpott in Hurlingham, which I think ought to work rather well.  Billy had a wonderful story about Josie being offered a job as hostess in an American officers club, she had all the qualifications but turned it down, & I think she is trying the Wrens.  Do write again soon you can't think how cheering your letters are, you seem so ungetatable, one never knows if any of these reach you. A big hug Margaret
-----------
Billy -
Josie Webster – daughter of Jo Webster
P. del E. – Punta del Este, Uruguay
Hurlingham – suburb of Buenos Aires

Photographs:

Included here are photos we took of P.G. 78 in 2004, and panoramic photos of P.G. 78 taken by others in 1943, 2000, and 2006.  For much more about P.G. 78 and the annual "Freedom Traill" walk (organised by the Liceo E. Fermi in Sulmona in commemoration of the Italian partisans and POWs who escaped the Germans in December 1943), search the web on:
   • "Freedom Trail da Sulmona"
   • "Il Sentiero della Libertà"

Sulmona – 2004

Studio Medico - Radiologico
Dott Torinto Sciuba
Corso Ovidio 43
Sulmona

Sulmona-01

Missing image.

Peter, outside Dr. Sciuba's clinic
(Source-Self: P. Benitz, 2004)

Dr. Torinto Sciuba was the camp doctor.  He helped Malcolm enormously during his escape – see Malcolm's escape diary.  We exchanged letters, sadly the good doctor died a few months before our visit in 2004.

Sulmona-02

Missing image.

Piazza Garibaldi, Sulmona
Good place for coffee, beer, & food.
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

Sulmona-03

Missing image.

Candy Flowers!
Sulmona is known for its candy.
René
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

Sulmona-04

Missing image.

Roman Aqueduct, Sulmona
Next to the Piazza Garibaldi.
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

P.G. 78 – Fonte d'Amore

PG78-01

Missing image.

P.G. 78, Fonte d'Amore, 1943 (north ⇒ right)
Rows of POW barracks enclosed by a triple wire fence; internal fences separated the barracks into compounds, by nationality & rank.
Looking west towards Sulmona.
(Source: Various, first: Liceo E. Fermi, Sulmona)

PG78-02

Missing image.

P.G. 78, Fonte d'Amore, 2006 (north ⇒ right)
The red-roofed buildings enclosed by the white wall are the remaining POW barracks.  Sulmona is the city in the background.
(Foreground high-rise is a police school.)
(Source: Camminare nella storia blog)

PG78-03

Missing image.

P.G. 78, Fonte d'Amore, 2000 (north ⇒ right)
The remaining barracks in the east (nearest) row can be visited.
Malcolm: was in the British officers compound, now the south square of green grass.
(Source: Liceo E. Fermi, Sulmona)

P.G. 78: For many more details, stories, and photos, search the web for: "P.G. 78 Fonte d'Amore Sulmona"

PG78-04

Missing image.

Shrine to the memory of
Capitano Pilota Francesco Santoro

The Italian camp commandant, he joined the partisans after Italy capitulated.  Tortured & executed by the Germans, 23 Oct 1943.
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-05

Missing image.

Modern front gate
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-06

Missing image.

Welcome!
The camp has been used as a military prison, and some of the barracks have been used for storage (reason why some now have roll-down doors).
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-07

Missing image.

Morrone Mountains
Looking NE over barracks, at monastery.
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-08

Missing image.

Monastery: Ereno di Sant Onofrio
Morrone mountains
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-09

Missing image.

East row of barracks
(Doors have been changed.)
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-10

Missing image.

Barrack hut, inside
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-11

Missing image.

Token of Gratitude
Issued by Field Marshal H.R. Alexander in appreciation of assistance provided to escapees.
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-12

Missing image.

Barrack hut, inside
(Source-Self: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-13

Missing image.

POW wall art
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-14

Missing image.

POW wall art
Australian Military Forces
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-15

Missing image.

POW wall art
II Hussars
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-16

Missing image.

POW wall art
Hampshire 1st 2nd 5th 7th
The York and Lancaster Regt

(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-17

Missing image.

POW wall art
12th London Regt. - EXCEL
The Rangers

(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-18

Missing image.

POW wall art
12 Royal Lancers
South Staffordshire
II Hussars

(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-19

Missing image.

POW wall art
Water Duties
Peat, Rolfe, Freeman, Smith...
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-20

Missing image.

POW wall art
B Squadron, 2nd Troop
Bradshaw, Boswell, Ware, Leadle...
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

PG78-21

Missing image.

POW wall art
7th Hussars
(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

 

PG78-22

Missing image.

POW wall art
Perardua ad astra
RAF, Bomber Sqd
Velox a Vindix

(Source: P. Benitz, 2004)

 


© Peter Benitz (Benitz Family)