Alfred A. Benitz Page last modified:

Alfred A. Benitz

1874 Diary:   July 28 – December 25

Oakland, CA., USA to Buenos Aires, Argentina

Page images in PDF files:

Click each title to download the image file:

Front & Back Covers, etc.
Front Cover & several blank pages; back pages with cash (pocket money) account register, scribbles, & Back Cover.  NOTE: The 1874 and 1876 diaries entries were recorded in the same book, so they share the same covers.
(PDF file size: 1.2mb.)
Oakland to Panama  (July 29 - Aug. 14)
Oakland to Panama on the SS Arizona.
(PDF file size: 4.5mb.)
Panama to New York  (Aug. 15 - 28)
Panama to New York on the SS Acapulco; stay in Hoboken at Busch’s Hotel.
(PDF file size: 3.7mb.)
NewYork to Southampton  (Aug. 29 - Sep. 8)
NewYork to Southampton on the SS Wesser.
(PDF file size: 2.4mb.)
Southampton to Buenos Aires  (Sep. 9 - Oct. 8)
Southampton to Buenos Aires on the SS Boyne.
(PDF file size: 2.5mb.)
Buenos Aires & Rosario  (Oct. 9 - Dec. 25)
City life in hotels & a rented home while father searches for land.
(PDF file size: 3.4mb.)

Transcription:

Transcribers’ Notes:  As this diary was hand-written, certain liberties were taken in formatting the text to this page:

No names were withheld to protect any innocence.  (Transcribed by: René A. Benitz.)


Contents

S.S. Arizona - Oakland to Panama
S.S. Acapulco - Aspinwall to New York
Busch's Hotel, Hoboken, New Jersey
S.S. Weser - Hoboken to Southampton
S.S. Boyne - Southampton to Buenos Aires
Argentina

S.S. Arizona

Oakland, July 28 - 1874.
This is our last day in California, as we start tomorrow. I arose this morning at about six o’clock, and went to the butcher this morning. I took two pills this morning, and one last night. After breakfast I went to the Grocery store. This forenoon I took my pistol a part, but could not put it together again, so I paid 10¢ to the machinest to put it together again, leaving me .45¢ We carried all the trunks, etc, down stairs this morning. This afternoon I had my hair cut, and mother gave me .35¢, making me 80¢. This afternoon I helped to tear up two carpets. After supper I went to the post office, and also bid good bye to Beels. At eight o’clock I went after the “Boys’ and Girls’ Weekly,” but as it had not yet come, I went again half an hour later. Williamses came this evening, and I and Charley walked up Broadway with them, and bid them farewell. There were a good many visitors here this evening. It was a very disagreeable day.

Missed the boat.

Pacific Mail Steamship Co.
San Francisco docks

Brannan Street, c.1864
the 2 trans-Pacific paddle steamers are unidentfied.
(Source: Bancroft Library, Univ. of California at Berkeley
via Wikipedia)

Wednesday July 29- 1874.
Off the coast of California on the Steamer ‘Arizona’. I got up this morning at about quarter to five, and put on my sunday clothes. Today we commenced the trip to South America, Before breakfast (6:30) I helped to carry trunks to the sidewalk to be taken by the express wagon. Before breakfast I wrote a very short letter to Mr. Howard, and then took it to the post office. Willie rode on the express wagon to San Francisco. Before eight o’clock we all walked to the depot, and then took the 7:50 train and steamer for San Francisco. I and Frank walked to the steamer ‘Arizona’ while the rest rode in a hack. I and Frank and Herman are going to sleep in one room, No. 5. About an hour after we came on board, many of our friends came to see us. there were Mr. and Mrs. Flatt, Nettie and Dr. Verhave, Harvey Burdell, Dr. and Mrs. Burdell, Mr. and Mrs. Shussler and Bella Welham, Annie Menges, Mr. Sharp, Mrs. Delgar, and Mr. Behrens, Mr. Helmke, Mr. Parker, and Theodore Hardwig. Dr. Cole is going on the same steamer, and the steamer was crowded with his friends, and he also had a band playing. At twenty minutes past twelve o’clock, the steamer cast loose from the wharf, and a cannon was shot on board, and then we slowly steamed out of the Harbor. Good bye Oakland and friends; never expect to see you again. We passed Ft. Point at ten minutes past one, and through Golden Gate twenty minutes past one. We passed Pescadero about three o’clock. We have been up to the present time (4:P.M.) in sight of land, and have felt no symptons of sea sickness. At about two oclock they had dinner and at six, supper. They have very good things to eat. After supper I and Josephine walked about the deck, arm-in-arm. At about seven a school of porpoises followed the steamer, they are very gracefull fishes as they jump out of the water. Their color is brown on top, and white underneath. They general go two by two, and they followed the ship nearly an hour. We also seen two whales spouting in the distance. Towards night the sea is getting rougher. At half past eight I came to my room, after waiting a while for a lantern. I am going to sleep on top, Frank in the middle, and Herman underneath. It was a very pleasant day, and they all say it couldn’t have better for the beginning of a voyage.

Daughter Josephine’s 1874 Album includes pictures of some of the people listed above.

Thursday, July 30.
When I got up this morning (6:40) we were out of sight of land, and have been up to this time (10 A.M). I slept pretty well last night. Before breakfast (8 A.M.) I and Charlie walked about the steamer. After breakfast I read the “Wild Oats” on deck. Before dinner I sat on deck and read “Boy’s and Girl’s Weekly.” At twelve o’clock the steamer had gone 250 miles, and was in latitude 34° 02´ and longitude 121° 02´. After dinner I walked around the steerage, and looked at the engine, and then I held some worsted for Josephine. Afterwards I walked around a while with Charlie, and then heard a man play on the piano. I seen a couple of more whales blowing in the distance this afternoon. At four o’clock precisely they had a false alarm of fire to train the chinamen what to do in case of fire. They rushed to the boats, buckets, and squirted with the hose into the sea. Nothing of notice occured before supper. After supper I walked around the lower deck with Charley, and then I walked alone a good while, and then I went into the parlor and heard Hammercity play on the piano. I went to bed at half past six. We received our eating tickets today. We all sit together on one table. It is getting warmer today, though the sun hardly appeared

Friday, July 31 - 1874.
10:20 A.M. Off the southern coast of California. I got up this morning, after a restless night, at half past six, and then walked around the steamer with Charlie, Before breakfast I seen a flying fish skimming above the water for a distance of about fifty feet. It had four wings or fins; two above its tail, and two at its shoulders, and it was about eight inches long. This forenoon I walked around, read “Harpers Magazine,” and seen the captain take the observations. At twelve o’clock we had run 261 miles in the last 24 hours, and were in latitude 30° - 25´ and longitude 118° - 08´. The Arizona burns forty tons of coal per day. This afternoon I walked around the deck, and also read. At five o’clock we had a supper consisting of – clam soup, deep sea water bass, roast beef, tea and cake, and mush melon. After supper I walked around the upper deck, until 8 o’clock when I went to bed. It was a moderately cold, the sun not coming at all. At about 10 o’clock A.M. we were oposite the boundary line of Mexico and California, though we were out of sight of land.

Saturday. August 1. 1874.
Off the coast of lower California, 4th day at sea. I got up this morning at seven o’clock, and eat an orange. At half past eight o’clock we had a breakfast, consisting of – Beef steak, sausages, fried rice, and coffee. This forenoon I seen some more flying fish. At noon we were in latitude 27° - 17´ and longitude 115° - 15´ and had run 246 miles in the last 24 hours, making 757 miles from San Francisco. This forenoon I passed in sitting on deck, and walking around, and after dinner I read – “the Knights of Pythia’s” or “put up.” They flying fishes have no wings only fins. They jump out of the water and the winds blows them along, like a kite. They can stay out of the water as long as their fins are wet. The afternoon passed very lonesomely; this thing – is getting very monotonous, Nothing in sight but water and sky or fog. This afternoon was very hot, but this forenoon was rather cold, without any sun, After supper I walked around a while, and then looked at some papers,

Sunday, August 2nd 1874.
Off the coast of Lower California. I went to bed last night at half past seven, and arose this morning at about eight after a restless night, and walked about the ship with Charlie before a breakfast, which consisted of Beef-steak, sausages, omlets, and tea. At 10:30 A.M. they had divine service on board, but I did not attend. They stretched the awning across the upper deck this morning. At noon we had run 260 miles in the last 24 hours, making it 1017 miles from San Francisco, and were in latitude 24° - 07´ and in longitude 112°. This afternoon I lounged around upon the upper deck. At about seven P.M. the wake of the steamer was covered with phosforescence, it looked like the stars, and was very pretty. After supper I went on the bow of the steamer and heard some young men singing. There was a hot south wind this evening. It was a very hot day. I bought an apple for 5¢ today, leaving me 75¢.

Monday, August 3d 1874.
In Gulf of California. We are in the Tropic zone today. It was dreadful hot last night, and I did not sleep much. I arose this morning at about seven o’clock, and eat an orange before breakfast. I put on my linnen coat and slippers today, as it was very warm. This forenoon I walked and sat upon the upper deck. At noon we had gone 244 miles in the last 24 hours, making it 1261 miles from San Francisco. This afternoon I lounged about the deck, and also tried to sleep in my bed, but not succeeding in that I fell aseep in a chair on deck. I felt a little seasick this after noon and vomited a little after supper. It was a very hot day.

Missed the boat.

SS Arizona’s
sister ship SS Montana

Wooden side-wheeled steamers built for the Pacific Mail Steamship Co., both launched 1865 & scrapped 1877
2,676 tons, 318 feet
(Source: Univ.Wyoming, American Heritage Ctr.)

Tuesday, August 4th 1874.
Off coast of Mexico. 7th day at sea. I got up at about seven o’clock this morning, and eat an apple before breakfast. I bought 2 apples yesterday from the barber for 10¢ leaving me 65¢. This forenoon I laid on a bench on deck; as I feel sea sickish today, and after supper I vomited a little, I eat a very little the whole day: Beefsteak at breakfast; soup at dinner, and roast beef at supper. After supper we met the steamer ‘Montana’ from Panama for San Francisco. Our steamer stopped, and a boat was lowered to deliver the mail, Before dinner we saw a great many porpoises around the steamer, The whole after noon I laid in my bunk. At noon we had run 265 miles in the last 24 hours, making it 1526 miles from San Francisco, and were in latitude 18° 54´ and longitude 104° 48´ It was a very hot day.

Wednesday August 5 - 1874
Off coast of Mexico. 6th day at sea. I slept last night on top of the cover as it was so hot. I put on very little clothing today: thin pants, shirt, linnen coat, and stockings and slippers. This forenoon and after noon I did nothing particularly. We had supper at 4 o’clock this afternoon instead of five. We were in sight of land all day yesterday, and today we could see the hills very plainly. At noon today we had travelled 255 miles in the last 24 hours, making it 1781 miles from San Francisco, and were in latitude 17° - 05´, and in longitude 100° - 46´. This evening we arrived at Acapulco: at five o’clock we entered the very muchly hidden harbor of Acapulco, which was guarded by a light house. We came to anchor at about half a mile from the town. As soon as the steamer stopped the harbor officials, came around the ship and then the passenger boats, and fruit canoes. The canoes were hollowed out logs, and were propelled by the Mexicans and indians with paddles. Permission being obtained from the captain, we got into a boat and were rowed to the town. Josephine, Willie, Frank and I went on shore. Previous to going mother gave me $1.00 making me $1.05. We had to pay 50¢ apiece for the passage to and from shore. We immediately walked up the town, and then around it. We were followed by a great many boys and girls who wanted to sells us flowers, shells, small parrots, squirrels, and fruit. I bought a string of shells (10¢) which I gave to Johnnie, and then I bought a basket full of shells (25)¢, and then afterwards I bought some aguavas (10)¢ We seen two ruins of churches, destroyed by earth quakes. The streets are very narrow, about 10 to 20 ft. wide. The roofs are generally covered with tiles or were thatched. We seen several naked little boys, and they all have very white and even teeth. We seen several tall trees with cocoanuts on them. The town is guarded by a large low forth, in front of which were many large live oaks. Every thing looked very green; quite different from California. When the cannon sounded, we got into the boats, and were rowed back to the steamer, We were on shore about 45 minutes. On the steamer I bought 20 oranges for 25¢, and a couple of bananas for 10¢, leaving me altogether 35¢. At about 7:30 P.M. the steamer steamed out of the harbor again. The harbor of Acapulco is nearly land-locked, and when we were in it we could not tell where the entrance was. It was a hot day; 85° Fahrenheit when I got up.

Thursday August 6 - 1874.
Off coast of southern Mexico. It rained a good deal last night. This forenoon I listened to others talking, eat oranges, bananas, and drank lemonade. At noon we had run 215 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 1996 miles from San Francisco. And were in Latitude 15° 23´ and in Longitude 97° 30´. This afternoon I did nothing particularly. After supper I staid up on deck. I did not eat much the last three or fours day for my health. At about noon we ran into a heavy rain which lasted for about an hour. It was a pretty hot day.

Friday August 7 - 1874
I arose this morning, after a restless night, at about 7 o’clock, and eat an orange before breakfast. This forenoon I principally read the “Jolly Joker”, a borrowed paper. At noon today we had run 247 miles in the last 24 hours, making it 2243 miles from San Francisco. And were in Latitude 13° 38´ and in Longitude 93° 39´. This afternoon we seen several whales. At noon today we were off the isthmus of Tehauntapec. At about eleven o’clock it rained again. This afternoon I laid on my bed, read “Days Doings”, and did nothing. After supper I went on deck, and heard the people talk on religion, and then stayed in the dining room. It was a moderately hot day. Nearly all the workmen and waiters on this steamer (Arizona) are Chinamen.

Saturday August 8 - 1874.
Off coast of Central America. Frank’s bunk broke down last night, so he had to sleep in the dining room. When I got up this morning, we were in an awful thunder storm. It thundered very loudly for about an hour, and it lightened very near the ship. This forenoon I read some papers, and this afternoon I studied Spanish a little while. After supper I read a charming story in ‘Harper’s Magazine. It was a pleasant day, not too hot or too cold. At noon today we had traveled 225 miles in the last 24 hours, making it 2468 miles from San Francisco, and were in Latitude 11° 47´ and in Longitude 90° 19´

Sunday August 9 - 1874.
Off coast of Central America. 11th day at sea. When I got up this morning I had a fearful head ache, and from it I was sea sick all forenoon, and threw up a great deal. Before breakfast I eat an orange. At 10:30 A.M. I attended divine service; the surgeon only read some chapters out of the bible. The whole afternoon I lay on my bed, and tried to learn the Spanish numerals; I nearly know them now. At noon today we had travelled 205 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 2673 miles from San Francisco; and were in Latitude 10° 03´ and in Longitude 87° 19´. We had a very good dinner at five o’clock: I had roast pork, oxtail soup, ice cream, pudding, cream pie, cakes, etc. After supper I walked about the deck, and heard some boys and girls talk and laugh near my room (No. 5).

Monday - August 10 1874.
Off coast of Central America – Pacific Ocean. 12th day at sea. I arose this morning at about seven o’clock, and eat a couple of oranges before breakfast. We were in sight of land all day: woody hills. I did nothing particularly this forenoon and afternoon. We were expecting to meet a steamer today, but none came. Expect to be in Panama tomorrow night. I went and got Mothers blanket and pillow for her this afternoon, for which she gave me 15¢, making me 50¢ At noon today we had travelled 250 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 3123 miles from San Francisco. And we were in Latitude 8° 09´, and in Longitude 83° 34´. We met the steamer “China” about 8 P.M. We sent a rocket up, and fired two blue lights, but did not stop. The other steamer was far off and replied by setting a blue light off. This even There is an amateur minstrel troupe on board, and this evening they sang songs, and recited poems etc. They winded up by singing “Auld Lang Syne”. They were finished at 11:30 P.M., and at time I went to bed. It was a very hot day.

Tuesday August 11 - 1874
Off In Panama Bay before Panama. 13th day at sea It rained hard all forenoon. And thundered and lightened too; but we staid under the awning. We were in Panama Bay all day. Before dinner we seen two large whales near the steamer, and many porpoises. At noon today we had run 266 miles in the last 24 hours and had gone in this voyage so far 3389 miles. This afternoon I took a sleep until 4 P.M. on my bed. We were in plain sight of land all day. It appeared woody hills. At 4 P.M. we commenced to see the many islands before Panama. And soon we could see the P.M.S.S. co’s Workshops. At about 5 P.M. we could see Panama, and at six o’clock we coul dropped Anchor three miles from Panama. We have charming scenery arounds us: a large green island less than 100 yds. behind us. and islands with houses on to the left of us. As we we were coming in a United States man of war had a band playing “Mollie Darling” which sounded very well on the water A few boats came around the steamer. And at about 8 P.M. a half a dozen officers of the Richmond came aboard.

You didn't miss anything: muddy, muggy, hot!

Panama City, 1850’s
from the sea
Large building & dock at right are the Panama Railroad’s Pacific Terminal

You didn't miss anything: muddy, muggy, hot!

Panama City, 1850’s
RR Terminus, from land
(Source: www.thepanamanews.com)

Wednesday August 12 - 1874.
Panama Harbor on board of S.S. Arizona. This morning early: 4:30 A.M. I could see the natives in their boats, hanging around the steamer. Long before breakfast, a large flat boat came alongside, and an engine on a boat alongside of that and began unloading the steamer of its wine casks, and hides. This morning they all, but Charley and I went to Panama: part in boats, and part in the little steamer; but when they came back again this afternoon they gave very discouraging reports of the town: of its uncleanliness, and its high prices of everything. At about eleven o’clock I and Charley and two girls got a native to row us to an island where Louisa ____ lives, for $1.00 for all, and back again, We walked along the shore and picked shells up until we got to Louisa’s house, where we went in for a little while, and then with her we walked through the cool, thick, woods to another part of the beech. We then walked back again to the boat, and then the native rowed us back to the ship. The trees were very low, and close together and so where there was no path, it was imposible to go through. We missed our dinner in going to the island, but I made it about even by eating a very hearty supper. When I came home I fished from the side of the steamer and was rewarded by catching a large cat fish – about a foot long – which I gave to a Chinaman. It rained a little before supper. It was a warm day.

Thursday, August 13 - 1874.
In Panama Bay, before Panama, on board of steamer ‘Arizona’. I was up this morning at about seven o’clock, and watched them unload the steamer, before breakfast Rhight after breakfast I got a boat to take I and Johnnie and Herman to the nearest island; where we walked along the beach, and tried to find shells. We walked along, until we got to some large rocks, where were some little ponds, where we got some star fish, sea-eggs, and live shells, and then we were rowed back again. I took off my boots and stockings in going after the shells in the ponds. When I came back again Willie and Mr. Hamerstede who had hired a row boat, took me into their boat, and I helped to row to the island where Louisa lives. We walked along the beach to the other island and then back to the boat and then we rowed back to the steamer. I climbed up to the steamer on a rope. We were just in time for dinner. This afternoon I did nothing particularly: laid in my bed, and fished a little. A good many rumors are afloat, respecting our departure: some say we are going tomorrow at 11 A.M. others say Saturday 5 A.M. and others, Monday. Mother went to Panama in the steamer today, and came back before supper. It was a hot day. It rained a good deal this after noon.

Friday, August 14 - 1874.
In Panama Bay before Panama, on steamer Arizona. I did not do any thing today. This forenoon we were going to hire a boat, to ride around, but could not get any. This afternoon I staid on the upper deck, and watched the others knock hats off. This evening the Brass band, and officers of the frigate ‘Richmond’ came aboard, and played a little, while the others danced. The minstrel troupe on board, also gave an entertainment: consisting of songs, and recitations. They continued until 12 o’clock, when I went to bed. We are to go across the isthmus of Panama tomorrow morning early. It was a very hot day

S.S. Acapulco

Missing image.

SS Acapulco
Trial Run - Oct.1873
Description of Accomodations
(Source: New York Times)

Saturday, August 15th 1874.
On board steamer Acapulco before Aspinwall. The gong sounded for us to get up this morning at half past four, and we had breakfast at five. After breakfast we all went on a little steamer, which took us to Panama. They landed us at the Company’s warehouses, which was also the depot for the Panama R.R. In getting out of the steamer The soldiers to prevent us from smuggling things in, lined the steamer to the depot. The cars started, and we were whirled to Aspinwall a distance of 47 miles, which we made in 2 hours and 45 minutes. I stood on the platform most of the time. The road runs through forests, swamps, luxuriant vegetation, etc. We passed a few clumps of houses, here and there; most were covered with leaves etc, and others were tiled. At quarter past ten we arrived at Aspinwall, where the Acapulco laid. As soon as the cars stopped a great many niggers crowded in to carry our baggage, and they were very bold. We walked to the Acapulco, which laid at the wharf, about 100 yards from the depot. The Acapulco is an iron steamship, screw propeller, of 3000 tons, and is about a year old. It is a magnificent steamer, and is a great deal prettier than the other steamer. TIty hase white sailors, and black waiters. I and Charley are going to have one room No. 45. Before dinner Father, Willie and I went into Aspinwall to buy some oranges and limes. It is a very miserable and stinking place. Nearly all the inhabitants are niggers, and they are very impudent, We went up one street and down another. We went into a saloon and had a drink of iced lemonade. There is one large two storied stone building, it is 300 ft. long. Most of the stores are fruit stores, and saloons, We got 50 oranges, and 100 limes, and then returned to the steamship and had dinner. Mother gave me 40¢ after dinner, making me 90¢. After dinner I and Johnnie went into Aspinwall, and walked around the town, and I bought some cakes for 10¢, leaving me 80¢. While we were in the town, it began raining very hard, and so we had to wait about an hour, before we could get on board again. The rest of the afternoon I walked about the wharf and seen them loading the steamship with Bananas, and canned salmon. After supper the steamer started for New York. It was a hot day. It rained while we were ashore 8 inches. Once more on the sea.

Sunday, August 16 1874.
In Caribbean Sea, per Steamship Acapulco. When I got up this morning I was quite sea sick, and threw up a good deal this forenoon, and right after supper. I laid down in my room at about 11 A.M. until about 2 P.M. so missing my dinner. This afternoon I staid on the upper deck, and laid down on the benches. We were out of sight of land all day. At noon we were 191 miles from Aspin—

Monday, August 17 - 1874.
In Caribbean Sea, per Steamship Acapulco, I got up this morning at about six o’clock and eat an orange before breakfast. I did not do anything particularly all day, but lay around the deck. At noon today we had gone 240 miles in the last 24 hours, making it 431 miles from Aspinwall, and were in Latitude 15° 40´ and in Longitude 76° - 31´ This evening, long after supper, I was half laying down, on a bench on deck, when I suddenly fell asleep and when awoke again, I could not find my hat again; and I suppose the wind blew it off into the sea. It was a hot day, but very windy all day, it was a head wind, and kept the steamer back all good deal

Tuesday, August 18 - 1874.
I got up this morning at about six o’clock, after a good sleep, and eat an orange before breakfast. This is the 3d day at sea. This forenoon I laid about the deck. I wore Charley’s straw hat this forenoon, as I had no more hats, but this afternoon a sailor found my hat on deck and gave it to me; so it was not lost. At noon today we had travelled 248 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 679 miles from Aspinwall, and were in Latitude 19° 20´ and in Longitude 74° 26´. This morning early we were in sight of San Domingo, and this afternoon, of Cuba. This afternoon I laid on a bench on deck. It was quite rough this evening, and the steamer rolled a good deal. This evening a booby alighted on a mast, and a sailor climbed after it, and caught it. After supper I laid on the deck, and then went down to the parlor to hear the minstrel troupe perform. They have the sails up all the time now.


1874.

August 16 - 1874.
Latitude - 11° 57´
Longitude - 78° 01´
Distance travelled. 191 miles
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug. 17 - Latitude - 15° 40´
Longitude - 76° 31´
Dist travelled - 240 miles
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 431 miles
Aug. 18 - Latitude - 19° 20´
Longitude - 74° 26´
Dist travelled - 248
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 679 mils from A–
Aug - 19. Latitude - 23° 52´
Longitude - 74° 24´
Distance gone 273 miles
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
952 miles from Aspinwall.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug. 20 - Latitude - 28° 36´
Longitude - 74° 35´
Distance gone - 285 miles
1273 mils from Aspinwall
Aug. 21   Latitude - 33° 06
Longitude - 74° 29´
Distance Gone 270
Aug. 22 - Lat. 38°
Long. 74° 10
Dist gone. 296
Dist from port.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Captain Seabury of Arizona.
Commodore Gray '' Acapulco.

Captain


Wednesday - August 19 - 1874.
Off coast of southern Florida, on Steamship ‘Acapulco’. 4th day from Aspinwall, 21st day from San Francisco. When I arose this morning (6 A.M). it was very quite, but after breakfast it got very rough and the steamer rolled very much. I staid on the upper deck all day to keep from getting sick, but when I went down to wash for lunch I vomited right off. At noon today we had run 273 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 952 miles from Aspinwall. We were in sight of land some islands today, At noon we were in Latitude 23° 52´ and in Longitude 74° 24´. It rained several times today. This evening I staid on deck.

Thursday, August 20 - 1874.
Off coast Alab Georgia, on Steamship ‘Acapulco’ 5th day from Aspinwall. 22nd day from San Francisco. It was not so rough today as yesterday. This forenoon I staid on deck, and seen them play cards. At noon today we had run 285 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 1273 miles from Aspinwall, and were in latitude 28° 36´ and in longitude 74° 35´. This afternoon I laid down on deck, and in the parlor and tried to sleep. After supper, which by-the-way consisted of ‘turkey, greeen turtle, pudding, cakes, and ice cream, and nuts, I walked up and down the deck, and heard the ladies sing. It was a pleasant day.

Friday, August 21st 1874.
Off coast of South or North Carolina, on Steamship ‘Acapulco’, 6th day from Aspinwall, 23d day from San Francisco. W I did not sleep very well last night, probably the result of eating too much for supper. This forenoon and afternoon I did nothing particularly, tried to sleep in the upper parlor, and sat around, etc. At noon today we had run 270 miles in the last 24 hours, and making it 1543 miles from Aspinwall, and were in latitude 33° 06´ and in longitude 74° 29´. This evening I sat on deck with the rest of the family, and sat walked around. The sea was very smooth today, as smooth as a glass. It was a delightful day, pretty hot.

Missing image.

SS Acapulco
ship’s manifest

Saturday. August 22 1874.
7th day from Aspinwall and 24th day from San Francisco. On Steamship Acapulco off coast New Jersey. Last night we were off Cape Hatteras, and it was pretty rough, but as I was in bed I did not feel it much. I was up pretty late this morning, but I was in plenty time for breakfast. We seen a good many sailing vessels in the distance today. Expect to be in New York tonight. At noon today we had gone 296 miles in the last 24 hours, (pretty good run) and were in latitude 38° and were in longitude 74° 10´ This forenoon and afternoon I laid about and heard the others talking. This afternoon I got windy and rained hard too, This evening we had turkey and ice cream. This evening we seen several lighthouses, a sign of being near New York. After supper I walked up and down deck, and then went to bed at about 8:30 P.M.

Busch's Hotel, Hoboken, New Jersey

Missing image.

Busch’s Hotel
Hudson & 3rd.Street
Hoboken was part of the port of New York & New Jersey, predominantly German
(Source: US Library of Congress)

Sunday August 23d 1874.
Busch’s Hotel, Hoboken N.J. near New York. I could not sleep after about 2 o’clock, so I and Charley got up at half past four. We took in a pilot about 2 A.M. I and Charley looked at the ships, we were passing, and at the land. At about six o’clock we passed several forts. At about 5 A.M. we passed Sandy Hook which is 20 miles from New York. At 6:30 we had to wait for the health officer to come on board and then we had to wait again about 7 o’clock before the dock, for a steamer to get out of the way. At 7:30 A.M. we were fastened to the wharf. We waited for about an hour and as uncle did not appear we carried our baggage on to the wharf, and I helped to uncheck our baggage. Father got an express wagon to take our things to Hoboken, and engaged two hacks to take us over. We got into the hacks and were driven on board the Hoboken steamer, and were taken across the Hudson river, (about 1½ miles) to Hoboken, and were driven to Busch’s Hotel, where we are going to stay. Last night on board the steamer, I had my pants hanging in my state room by my window, and in the pants, in my purse, I had 80¢. And this morning when I looked into my purse all the money was gone; so I suppose one of the negro waiters stole it. And I have no more money left. This forenoon I and Charley took a walk up and down the street. Hoboken is a very pretty little city of about 20,000 inhabitants and is right across the Hudson river from New York about 1½ miles. After dinner Frank, Charlie and I walked way up the street, and back by the north river. It was a splendid through groves of large trees. The rest of the afternoon we staid in the hotel. Mr. Busch is an immense man and weighs 420 pounds. I and Johnnie are going to sleep in one bed in our room, and Charlie and Herman in the other. It was very cold this morning early, but this afternoon it was pleasanter. Nearly every one in Hoboken is German, and today large numbers came from New York.

Monday. August 24 - 1874.
Busch’s Hotel. Hoboken, N.J. near New York. Last night a burglar tried to get into our room, with the aid of a pair of nippers, but the key would not turn for him and the door was bolted, so he left. This morning we could see the marks on the key made by the nippers. After breakfast I and Charley went to New York. Father gave us 75¢ apiece. We took the Hoboken ferry for New York which cost us 3¢ apiece leaving me 72¢. We had our money in greenbacks and nickels. We then went on board of the steamship ‘Idaho’ to see if one of Charlie’s friends was on board. We then walked around town looking at the cutlery and gun, stores, until we got to the Fulton ferry, when we returned back to the Hoboken ferry and back on the steamer to Hoboken. We got very tired walking on the hard streets, and were very glad to get just in time for dinner. My expenses were: I lent 25¢ to Charlie for him to buy a compass, 1¢ for an apple, and 3¢ again for the ferry, making 32¢ leaving me 43¢. This afternoon I and Charley walked about the business part of Hoboken, and I bought 3 Boys & Girls Weeklies for 15¢, leaving me 28¢. After supper we all took a walk along the river and back by the principal street. I foregot to say yesterday that uncle and Mr. Mahrer came to the hotel to see us. They arrived last thursday, and are staying in New York. Mr. Mahrer and wife, who is father’s sister are also going with us to South America. Today uncle and Mr. and Mrs. Mahrer came to see us. We got another room in which are three beds, for Willie, Charlie and I. It was a pleasant day.

Tuesday, August 25th 1874.
Busch’s Hotel, Hoboken N.J. near New York. I went to bed last night at about eight o’clock, and in a little while a large band of music went past. After breakfast father gave me $1.50 making me $1.78 Frank, Willie, and I went to New York today. We took the Barclay street ferry, which landed us way in the southern part of the city; And then we walked up to the Acapulco, and then way down to the office of Brazil steamship line, in Bowling Green, and found that the price to Rio Janeiro is $200. and then we walked way up to the end of Broadway, stopping at Remington’s gun store, and priced the guns. We then took the horse cars for Central Park, where we walked around the delightful walks, to the menagerie, where we looked at all the animals: rhinocerous, lions, elephants, alligators, etc. We then walked around to the beautiful lake, and looked at the boats. All the walks in the garden are made of asphaltum. They are some beautiful summer houses in the garden. We then went into the casino, a beautiful eating house, and had a cup of chocolate, and a sandwich for 30¢. We then walked up to the deep dark cave, and then to the beautiful stone castle. We then came outside and Frank bought some doughnuts, which we eat in the park. There are some nice fountains in the park. We then took the horse cars for the ferry, and the ferry for home, and arrived just in time for supper. My expenses were, 6¢ to and from New York, 30¢ lunch, and 5¢ horse cars, and a drink of mineral soda in the park, 10¢, leaving me $1.27. After supper I and Charlie went down town and I bought a Boys & Girls Weekly for 5¢, leaving me $1.22 It was a pleasant day.

Wednesday, August 26th 1874.
Busch Hotel Hoboken N.J. opposite New York. Today every This forenoon every body went to New York but me, and I staid at home and wrote a 6 page letter to Mr. Howard. I also bought an apple 1¢, and a Boys’ & Girls weekly, for 5¢, leaving me $1.16. After dinner I and Charley went to New York, and walked to the Castle Garden, and then to the Fulton ferry, and then back to Hoboken. My expenses we 6¢ to & from New York, leaving me $1.10. After supper I and Charlie went down town and I bought 84 feet of strong fish line for 60¢, leaving me 50¢. Afterwards I walked around town a little, to pass away the time. It was a cool day. Charley paid me back my 25¢ today, making me 75¢.

Thursday, August 27th 1874.
Busch Hotel, Hoboken N.J. opposite New York. This forenoon I stayed at the hotel, and did nothing particularly. We are going to Southampton, England, and from there to Buenos Ayres. The steamer Wesser is going to start on Saturday, and we are going on it, as no steamer is going to South America, and no sailing vessel will take us. After dinner we went with father down town, and carried back a new trunk for Josephine. We then went on board of the Wesser, which is in Hoboken, it is nearly as nice as the Acapulco. We are going in the 2nd cabin. which costs $60 each. I and Charley then went to New York, and I bought 6 hooks, for 12¢, and lent 40¢ to Charley to buy a line. We then came back again. My expenses were 6¢, to & from New York, 12¢ hooks, and 40¢ to Charley, and I bought 10¢ worth of peanuts, making 68¢, leaving me 7¢. After supper I and Charley took a long walk out of town, and were back by eight o’clock. Father today bought 4 Winchester rifles to be sent over tomorrow. Before going to bed I read a “Boys & Girls Weekly” or two. It was a pleasant day, with a cool morning.

Friday, August 28th 1874.
Busch Hotel, Hoboken N.Y. opposite New York. This forenoon Father, Frank, Willie, Charlie, and I went to New York. We took the ferry over, and there, walked to a gun store on Broadway, and as our guns were not yet finished we went to a banking house, and father had his money fixed. An We then went into a saloon and had a glass of soda and then us three youngest came home, in time for dinner. My expenses were 3¢ from New York to Hoboken, leaving me 4¢, and I bought an apple this afternoon for 2¢ leaving me 2¢. This afternoon I stayed around the hotel, reading the ‘Boy’s & Girl’s Weekly’. Mother and the children went over to Central Park today, and had a good time. There are a great many street musicians in Hoboken. This evening Mr. & Mrs. Muller came to see us. It was a very pleasant. I bought candy for 2¢ leaving me 0¢

S.S. Weser

Missing image.

New York Departure
30 August, 1874
(Source: New York Times)

Saturday August 29 - 1874.
Off Sandy Hook, in Steamship Weser, bound for Southampton & Bremen. Today we started for Southampton, and from there to Buenos Ayres. This forenoon we staid around the hotel fixing the baggage, etc. Father bought a barrel of apples to take along this morning. After breakfast I went with him, to buy a checker board and papers. After dinner we went down to the wharf and went aboard of the Wesser. The steamer was full of people, but they most of them went on shore again. At about 3 o’clock the steamer started, after we said good bye to Hammerstede, There are 12 of us on the steamer; our family, uncle, and Mr. Mahrer and wife. The Wesser is a steamship of the North German Lloyd, of 3000 tons burden, and 700 horsepower. It is an iron screw propeller. We have breakfast at 7:30 A.M. dinner at 12. coffee at 3 P.M. and tea at 7 P.M. There is a band of music on board, composed of waiters, but it is not a crack band, and they play every day at 11 o’clock. The 2nd cabin where we sleep is down below. I and Frank and another young man are going to sleep in one room. The rooms are very large, and have 4 bunks.

Sunday, August 30 - 1874.
On Atlantic ocean, on Steamship Weser for Southampton. I got up this morning at about six o’clock, and stayed on deck until breakfast. This forenoon I read the ‘Boys & Girls Weekly’, and this afternoon I read ‘Harpers’ magazine, etc. It was a cold day, and rained a very little. The steamer smokes a good deal, and drops much soot, which dirties everything. We are out of sight of land today. At noon today we had run 227 miles in the last 18½ hours, and were in latitude 40° 41´ and in longitude 68° 53´. After supper I walked with Josephine.

Monday, August 31 - 1874.
On Atlantic ocean on steamship Weser for Southampton & Bremen Today I read all day, and laid on the sofa in my room, It was a pleasant day. Miserable day, cold, drizzly and windy At noon today we had run 281 miles in the last 24 hours, and were in latitude 41° 32´ and in longitude 62° 47´. The seasick ones are mother Aunt Mahrer, and Herman, The sea today and yesterday was smooth and like a glass.


Aug. 30, 1874. Sunday.
Latitude, 40° 41´
Longitude - 68° 53´
Distance run in 18½ hr. 227 mi.

Aug 31. 1874. Monday.
Latitude - 41° 32´
Longitude - 62° 47´
Distance run - 281 miles.

Sept. 1. 1874. Tuesday -
Latitude 42° 44´ N.
Longitude 56° 17´
Distance run 298. 806 mi. from N.Y.

Sept. 2. 1874. Wednesday.
Latitude 44° 56´
Longitude 50° 27´
Dist run 1091 285 miles. 1091 miles from N.Y.

Sept. 3, 1874. Thursday.
Latitude - 47° 2´
Longitude - 44° 3´
Dist. run. 295 miles. 1386 from N.Y.

Sept. 4. 1874. Friday
Latitude - 48° 32´
Longitude - 37° 26´
Distance run. 292 miles. 1678 miles from New York.

Tuesday Sept. 1, 1874.
On Atlantic ocean, on steamship Weser bound for Southampton & Bremen. I passed the day about the same as yesterday, After supper I went into the smoking room, and heard them talking of 1848 in California, and then I went into the dining room, and heard the fiddlers playing. After that I went up on deck, where the wind was blowing furiously, and then went to bed. It was a miserable day, cold, rainy, and windy. I listened to the music this evening in the salon.

Tuesday Sept 1.
P.S.
We passed a great many 13 or 14 fishing-smacks this forenoon, catching cod fish. They are small schooners, and had little boats out. We also seen great many porpoises today. There was a thick fog this afternoon, and we blowed our whistle to avoid collissions. A great many stormy petrels followed the ship this evening. They are pretty, small birds of the shape of a

Wednesday, Sept, 2. 1874.
On Atlantic ocean on board the Steamship Weser bound for Southampton & Bremen. This forenoon I staid up on deck, and read, and this afternoon and evening I was in the Smoking room, and also heard the band playing in the salon. It was quite rough today. At noon today we had run 285 miles in the last 24 hours and were 1091 miles from New York, and were in latitude 44° 56´ and in longitude 50° 27´. It was a miserable day.

Thursday, Sept 3d. 1874.
In the middle of the Atlantic ocean, on board of the steamship Weser, bound for Southampton, and Bremen. I got up this morning in time for breakfast which consisted of beefsteak, and eggs. This forenoon I staid on deck, and read, and eat apples. This afternoon I slept on the lounge, and drank chocolate. After supper I staid up on deck, and walked around with Charlie. At noon today we had run 295 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 1386 miles from New York. And were in latitude 47° 2´, and were in longitude 44° 3´. The weather was miserable today, and the waves were pretty high.

Friday, Sept, 4. 1874.
In the middle of the Atlantic ocean, on board of the steamship Weser bound for Southampton & Bremen. I got up this morning just in time for breakfast, after a sleepless night. This forenoon I stayed up on deck and read; and I slept most of the afternoon on the lounge in my room and then read Harpers Magazine in our easy chair. No ships in sight today. 6th day from New York. This evening I stayed up on deck, and then went into the salon to hear the music. At noon today we had run 307 292 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 1678 miles from New York. And were in latitude 48° 32´ and were in longitude 37° 26´. Last night we seen a very pretty sun set; the clouds were of all colors, and were nicely arranged. The weather today was little better today than yesterday, and so were the waves.


Sept. 5, 1874. Saturday.
Latitude -
Longitude
Distance run. 307.   1985 from New York.

Sept. 6. 1874. Sunday.
Latitude 49° 54´
Longitude 21° 52´
Distance run - 308.   2293 from New York.

Sept. 7. 1874. Monday.
Latitude - 49° 56´
Longitude - 13° 42´
Distance run - 315 miles.
From Needles - 480 miles.

Sept. 8. 1874 Tuesday.
Latitude - 49° 50´
Longitude - 5° 38´
Distance run. 312 miles
From Needles - 166 miles

Saturday, Sept 5. 1874.
7th day at sea. On the Atlantic ocean on board of S.S. Weser bound for Southampton & Bremen. I got up this morning at half past seven and eat a slight breakfast. This forenoon I was up on deck, and seen several whales. This forenoon father gave me the companie’s guide book, which is a neat little blue pocket book, and gives descriptions of London & Paris, has advertisements, and memorandums, and has a track map of the course of the steamer. This afternoon I staid on deck, and read it. This evening I stayed in the salon looked at a German bound papers, and listened to the music of the fiddlers. At noon today we had run 307 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 1985 miles from New York, and were in latitude 49° 25´ and were in longitude 29° 46´. It was quite a pleasant days at time, but sometimes it was cold.

Sunday, Sept. 6. 1874.
On board of the S.S. Weser bound for Southampton. 8th day from New York. This forenoon I sat up on deck, and did nothing particularly. At 10 o’clock I listened to the band playing on deck. This afternoon I lounged about the salon, drank coffee, went into the smoking room, and heard the fellows of the opposite state room crack their jokes, etc. We seen a good many porpoises this afternoon. This forenoon it was pretty pleasant, but this afternoon it was miserabley disagreeable, raining, and foggy. At noon today we had run 308 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 2293 miles from New York. We were, also, in latitude 49° 54´ N. and were in longitude 21° 52´ W. This evening I listened to the music, and then went to bed while it was playing yet.

Monday, Sept. 7. 1874.
On board of the S.S. Weser bound for Southampton. near English Channel. 9th day at sea. This forenoon we seen a great many porpoises swimming near the steamer. I got up at seven o’clock, and staid on deck until breakfast (7:30). This forenoon I stayed up on deck, and read. This afternoon I slept in a bunk in Charlie’s stateroom, until 3:30, and then went on deck, a little while, looked at two ships in sight, and then went down into the smoking room. At noon today we had made 315 miles in the last 24 hours and were 480 miles from Southampton. (We were in latitude 49° 56´, and in longitude 13° 42´. This forenoon it was very pleasant, but this afternoon it was a cold wind. This evening the waiters made a collection for the music, father gave $20. This evening I listened to the music by the fiddlers in the salon, and went to bed at 10 o’clock.

Tuesday, Sept. 8. 1874.
Off southern coast of England on board of the S.S. Weser bound for Southampton. 10th day at sea. Expect to be in Southampton tonight sometime. I got up this morning at about 7 o’clock, and staid on deck until breakfast. This forenoon I lounged about the deck. At about 9 o’clock A.M. we could see the island of Scilly near Lands End. And at about 11 o’clock we could see Lands End, and seen land the rest of the day. After dinner we could seen cape Lizard which is high hills, and has the largest light house I ever seen, on it. The hills all the way are divided up into little fields, which look beautiful. All day, we seen many ships and steamers. At about two o’clock I took a sleep on the lounge in my room until coffee (3 P.M.) when weI had coffee, and eat five coffee cakes. This After that I and Charlie in his bunks until 5 P.M. I had a head-ache all day. We also seen many small villages in the sheltered parts of the hills. It was a very pleasant sunny days. At noon today we had run 312 miles in the last 24 hours, and we 166 miles from Needles. And we were in Latitude 49° 50´ and in Longitude 5° 38´. This after After supper I staid in the salon, played a game of checkers, with a woman, and then listened to the music by the fiddlers, and went to bed at 9:30 P.M.

S.S. Boyne

Missing image.

SS Boyne
Royal Mail Steam Packet Co.
Launched 1871, wrecked 1875
3,318 tons, sail & steam
(Source: The Illustrated London News)

Wednesday, Sept. 9. 1874.
On board of S.S. Boyne, bound for Buenos Ayres. In English Channel. Last night I got up at 11:30 P.M. seen the pilot come aboard in his boat, and then went to bed again. This morning, when I got up (5:30) we were opposite the great hospital on the island of Wight, before Southampton. The hospital is an immense building, the largest in the world, and is built of rock. We slowly drew up to the wharf at Southampton. We also seen a castle near Southampton, the queen’s summer residence. At about 6:30 A.M. we were fastened to the wharf. And then I helped to carry all our baggage on deck. After breakfast we went on shore to the custom house. Mother had some loose baggage in her hands, and they would not leave her take it on shore at first, but an officer made it all right. Father had some difficuly in satisfying the custom house officers’ demands, but £6 did it. Today we also leave for Buenos Ayres. At about 9 A.M. I went up into the city of Southampton and tried to buy a knife but could find none. Father also bought tickets for Buenos Ayres $146 a piece. We then went on a very little steamer, and at 11 A.M. were taken out to the South American steamer: the Boyne. The Boyne is an iron screw propeller of 3318 tons, and is 3 years old. It is a magnificent steamer. Everything is nice and new. After dinner I helped to carry our baggage, etc. A beautiful yacht sailed around the steamer several times. It was a beautiful affair. At about three o’clock the steamer began to start, and at about four it was going regularly. We could see land all the evening. At about 5 o’clock we were opposite the Needles, and the pilot took his leave. This steamer shakes rolls a good deal, and the rudder makes a good deal of noise. The sea is pretty rough this evening. We had some difficulty in getting seats for supper, but we finally got a table for our selves. There are a great number of passengers on board. There are two bunks in each room, and I and Frank sleep in the same room. After supper I staid up on deck until 8 o’clock and then went to bed.

Thursday, Sept. 10, 1874.
On board of the S.S. Boyne, bound for Buenos Ayres. In bay of Biscay, off coast of France. Today the sea was very rough, and the steamer rolled a great deal. Nearly everybody was sea-sick, and though I was pretty sea sick myself, I could not help laughing at the men on deck, looking into the water, feeding the fishes. This forenoon I layed about the deck, and then when the steamer rolled I would slide to one side of the boat, and then back again. I eat very little today, only a biscuit, and some bread. This afternoon I layed on the deck, and held on to the iron works, so as not to slide away. This evening it was so rough that the plates hopped out of the partitions on the table, and a great many were broken. It was pretty cold all day. At noon today we had run 197 miles in the last 20 hours, and were in Latitude     and were in Longitude.

Friday, Sept. 11. 1874.
On board of the S.S. ‘Boyne’ bound for Buenos Ayres, in Bay of Biscay off coast of France. 2nd day at sea. Today it was not quite so rough as yesterday, but still it was pretty rough. I got up this morning at about 8 o’clock and staid on deck, until breakfast. This forenoon I laid on a sort of wood work in the back part of the steamer, and tried to sleep, and this afternoon I did the same, only I tried to read. At noon today we had run 268 miles in the last 24 hours, were 160 miles from Cape Finnistere, and 401 from Lisbon. We were in Latitude 45° 10´, and in longitude 8° 51´. After supper I sat up on deck. It is getting a little warmer today.

Saturday, Sept. 12. 1874.
On board of the S.S. ‘Boyne’ bound for Buenos Ayres, off coast of Portugal. I got up this morning at about 7 o’clock, and staid on deck until breakfast time. The sea today was very smooth, and nearly all the people were on deck. This forenoon I sat up on deck and read, and watched the people. Expect to be in Lisbon tomorrow morning. After supper I staid on deck and then went to bed at 8 o’clock. It was a delightful day; not too hot or too cold.

Sunday, Sept. 13, 1874.
On board of the S.S. ‘Boyne’ bound for Buenos Ayres, off the coast of Portugal. When I got up this morning at 6 o’clock, we were in sight of land. This morning we entered the harbor of Lisbon. and We passed a few light houses, ruins of old houses, and at about eight o’clock we entered the harbor of Lisbon, and at one 9 o’clock we were anchored to a buoy about a miles from the city of Lisbon. The steamer was at once surrounded by large boats for passengers, and coal, and freight boats. Father, uncle, Mahrer, Willie and Frank went on shore. Lisbon was once destroyed by an earthquake, and a part of the city lay under water. I did nothing much this forenoon, but watching them load and unload. At about two o’clock father and the rest came back, they say that Lisbon is built all of stone, and the streets are paved beautifully, and that it was very hot. Mother bought a basket full of very good white grapes, and father a basket chair for $2.50. A great many passengers went off here, but still more came. At five o’clock we started again, and were soon out of sight of land. It was a delightful day. Today we had our room changed to, under the stairs.


Sept, 10. 1874. Thursday.
Latitude
Longitude.
Dist. run. 197 miles

Sept, 11. 1874. Friday.
Latitude - 45° 10´ N.
Longitude - 8° 51´ W.
Dist run. 268 miles.
160 to Finnisterre. 401 to Lisbon.

Sept, 12. 1874. Saturday
Latitude - 49° 3´ N
Longitude - 9° 53´ W.
Distance run. 254 miles.
147 to Lisbon.

Sept. 14. 1874. Monday.
Latitude - 35° 28´ N.
Longitude - 11° 48´ W.
Distance run. 231
480 to Teneriffe.

Sept. 15. 1874. Tuesday.
Latitude - 31° 3´ N.
Longitude - 14° 33´ W.
Distance run 300 miles.
169 to peak of Teneriffe.

Sept. 16. 1874. Wednesday.
Latitude   27° 1´ N.
Longitude - 17° 8´ W.
Distance run. 278 miles
749 to St. Vincent.

Sept. 17. 1874. Thursday.
Latitude
Longitude -
Distance run.
to St. Vincent

Sept. 18. 1874. Friday.
Latitude   20° 27´ N.
Longitude - 14° 33´ W.
Dist. run - 231 miles,
To St. Vincent - 240 miles

Sept, 20. 1874. Sunday.
Latitude - 13° 30´ N.
Longitude - 26° 29´ W.
Dist. run - 221 run.

Sept. 21. 1874. Monday.
Latitude   8° 57´ N.
Longitude   28° 00´ W.
Distance run 297 miles

Sept, 22. 1874. Tuesday.
Latitude - 5° 8´
Longitude - 28° 54´
Distance run 234 miles.

Wednesday Sept. 23d. 1874.
Latitude   00° 48´ N.
Longitude   31° 3´ W.
Distance run. 288.
290 to Moronho de Fernando

Sept, 24, 1874. Thursday.
Latitude - 3° 49´ S.
Longitude - 32° 43´ W.
Distance run - 294 miles.
off isle of Fernando de Moronho.
280 miles to Pernambuco.

Sept. 26 - 1874. Saturday.
Latitude   10° 17´ S.
Longitude   35° 26´ W.
Dist run. 151 miles.
"  to Bahia 254 miles

Sept. 28. 1874. Monday.
Latitude - 16° 53´ S.
Longitude   38° 6´ W.
Dist run 239 miles

Sept 29 - 1874. Tuesday.
Latitude - 21° 14´ S.
Longitude   39° 47 W.
Dist. run 280 miles
  "  to Rio 203   "

Monday, Sept 14 - 1874.
On board of the S.S. Boyne bound for Buenos Ayres, off coast northern coast of Africa. I got up this morning at 7 o’clock, and eat a bunch of grapes before breakfast. This forenoon I sat up on deck and practised braiding with three, four, five, and six strings. This afternoon I read, etc. At noon today we had run 231 miles in the last 19 hours, and were in Latitude 35° 28´ N. and in Longitude 11° 48´. W and were 468 miles from Teneriffe. This is the 5th day from Southampton. After supper I sat up on deck, and then played checkers with Josephine in the salon. It was a very pleasant day, and the water was pretty smooth.

Tuesday, Sept, 15, 1874.
On board of the S.S. Boyne bound for Buenos Ayres. I got up this morning at about seven o’clock, and eat a bunch of grapes. This forenoon I did nothing particularly, and this afternoon read a Holiday magazine. This evening I sat around on deck. At noon today we had run 300 miles in the last 24 hours, and were 169 miles from the peak of Teneriffe. And were in latitude 31° 3´ N. and in Longitude 14° 33´ W. It was a pleasant day, and the water regular.

Wednesday. Sept. 16, 1874.
On board of the S.S. Boyne, bound for Buenos Ayres, When I got up this morning at six o’clock we were opposite the peak of Teneriffe, on one of the Canary isles. We could only see the outlines of the mountain in the distance, and see patches of snow on the summit towering above the clouds. (it is 9000 ft. high. This forenoon I did nothing at all but sit around, and this afternoon I did the same. It was a very lonesome day. After supper I sat around until half past nine and then went to bed. At noon today we had run 278 miles in the last 24 hours, and were in Latitude 27° 1´ N. and in Longitude 17° 8´ W. It was a delightful day.

Thursday, Sept. 17. 1874.
On board of the S.S. Boyne bound for Buenos Ayres. I got up this morning at about 7 o’clock and blacked my shoes. This forenoon I did nothing particularly, but this afternoon I read a very interesting novel by the name of “Under two Flags”, and this evening I did the same in the salon.


Saturday, Oct. 3, 1874
Latitude 26° 9´ S.
Longitude 45° 9´ W.
Run 227 miles.

Sunday, Oct. 4. 1874.
Latitude 30° 33´ S.
Longitude 48° 35´ W.
Run 319 miles.

Monday, Oct. 5, 1874.
Latitude 34° 24´ S.
Longitude 53° 4´ W.
Run 324 miles.
Distance to Monte Video - 170 miles.

Tuesday, Oct, 6. 1874
Latitude 34° 47´ S.
Longitude 53° 59´ W.
Run - 50 miles.
Dist. to Monte Video 120 miles
foggy foggy.

Argentina

Oct. 9. 1874 Friday.
Nothing unusual occured in the last 3 or 4 weeks. At Sept. 19. we were at St. Vincent, on one of the Cape de Verd isles. Divers or swimmers came along side in boats, and dived for money throw them by the passengers and brought them up before reaching bottom. It was curious to see them sham fighting in the water. We were at Pernambuco Sept. 25, but it was too rough for us to go to town, but we watched some of the others going and some getting ducked on the stairs. We were at Bahia Sept 27, and we all went on shore in a row boat. we were taken up the elevator about 300 feet, and then walked to the garden or park, nice view of the harbor obtained In coming back we had a dinner at Hotel de Mülem which cost father $26.00 We were at Rio. Sept 30, Oct 1. & 2.. Oct 1. we went on shore in a row boat, and rode in a tram to the Botanic Garden; seen the splendid array of palms, etc. and then had lunch, and also went to the Public Garden and another park. Within 170 miles of Monte Video we ran into a heavy fog, and took us 50 hours to make that distance. We were at Monte Video Oct 7th. 3 P.M. to Oct 8th. 7 P.M. Sea at Oct 7. pretty rough. Arrived at Buenos Ayres Oct, 9. 1874. 5 A.M. stopped 11 miles from city. Went into a little steamer part of the way ($1.50), and in a row boat to the bridge. Horses and wagons unload boats 200 or 300 yds from shore in the water. Our trunks etc examined in the Custom house. Stop at Hotel del Norte. Went up town after supper.

Oct. 10. 1874. Saturday.
Rain all day, and sea very rough.

Oct 11. 1874. Sunday.
the same.

Oct. 12. 1874. Monday.
There was a false arlarm of fire in the hotel last night. Frank came thumping at my door at 2 A.M. and said ‘fire’! Lightening outside, I thought it was the flames, put on my pants, & could not open door, hammered against it, and put on my shoes & coat, & then opened door, and found the fire put out by Josephine & mother, in the top story.

Oct. 13 - Tuesday -
Walked around the city of Buenos Ayres with Charley.

Oct. 14 - Wednesday -
Got a “papalita” today at the U.S. consulate. Wrote a letter to Mr. Howard.

Oct. 15. Thursday.
Went to the public market before breakfast (10 A.M.) with uncle. Also walked around city with Charley, and alone.

Oct. 16. 1874. Friday.
Buenos Ayres. Went to a large hardware store with father, etc. before breakfast 10 A.M. Took a long walk to Barracas with Mr. Mahrer and Charley, (very tired.) after breakfast. Father also bot me a knife this morning 3 blader.

Oct 22 - 1874. Thursday.
I have been walking around the city in the last few days. On sunday we all went to the national museum; it is not much, it contains birds, and skeletons of extinct animals. Today father, uncle, Mr. & Mrs. Mahrer went up to Rosario in the cars and steamer. the former comes back again in a few days, while the rest stay. I bought a pair of green gogles today for $7m/c or 28¢ leaving me $3m/c. or 12¢. I also had my room changed today – to up on the roof, and sleep with Herman.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
At St. Vincent - Sept 19. 1874.
At Pernambuco    "   25   1874.
At Bahia                 "   27   1874
At Rio de Janeiro Sept 30 - Oct. 1. & 2nd.
At Monte Video, Oct. 7 - 3 P.M. to Oct. 8. 7 P.M.
Arrived at Buenos Ayres - Oct. 9, 1874. Friday. A.M.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Oct. 23 - 1874. Friday -
Mother gave me $5m/c today making me $8m/c or 32¢. Willie and I took a long walk way out to 11 de Septimbre. I studied Spanish also.

Buenos Ayres. Hotel del Norte.
Oct. 26 - 1874. Monday.
It thundered and lightened fearfully last night and also rained yesterday and last night. I bought a 3 fishhooks this morning for $1m/c or .04 leaving me $7m/c. I went up town this afternoon, and was caught in a heavy rain, but found shelter. I traded my new knife away to Charley this evening for a little 3 bladed knife, and a large 1 bladed one. After supper I – Bill & Charley went walking.

Oct - 28 - 1874. Wednesday.
Father came home from Rosario this morning. He reports the prospects of getting a good farm very good, and will take us all up Sumday. I took a long walk with Frank and Bill in the town last. Today we went with father & bought a map of Santa Fe and a tool chest.

Buenos Ayres Hotel del Norte.
Oct - 31 - 1874. Saturday.
I bought 264 feet of white fish line today for $7m/c or 28.¢ and then wound it around a board.

Nov. 1. 1874 - Sunday.
Today we started for Rosario. After coffee I helped Willie to carry the trunks &c down stairs and then to load them into a cart to be taken to the depot, We then followed the cart to the depot, and I helped to unload it into the baggage wagon car. I then staid there until 9:50 A.M. when the train started, to take care of the loose baggage. At 9:50 A.M. the train started for Tigre. We got there at about 12 o’clock. We had to walk a little way to the steamer, and we had to carry our hand baggage. We had to show our pass on going on board. The steamer started at about 1 P.M. when we had breakfast. Most of the afternoon the steamer went through sloughs, and had to be poled sometimes. At about 4 o’clock we entered the Parana. It is not as wide as I thought, but I could not see the other side as it is filled with islands. At six we had supper. We have very good thing to eat. I and Charley have to sleep in a room with two other men. It was a warm day.

Missing image.

Port of Rosario, c.1868
(Source: Colección Roberto Ferrari
via Wikipedia)

Nov. 2 - 1874. Monday.
I didn’t sleep very well last night, because it was cold. We stopped at San Nicholas at about 11 A.M. At 10 A.M. we had breakfast, I had to sit alone near the end of the boat. and it getting rough I nearly got seasick which many did. We arrived at Rosario at 2 P.M. and after our baggage passed the custom house, we had it driven to the Globe Hotel where we are going to stay. Mr. Mahrer is working in a machine shop owned by an American. The rooms in the hotel are good but the eating is bad.

Nov. 9, 1874 Monday.
Today we moved into the new house hired by father No. 150 Calle Rioja. I and Willie had to sleep in the house two nights already. We have folding beds, (catres) and cooking things, etc,

Nov. 15, 1874. Sunday.
This morning father and Frank started for Cordova in the cars, to take a look at the country. At about 11 A.M. I and Willie, uncle, Charley, and Mahrer walked out into the country up the river for about a league. We seen the soldiers camp (3000 men), a big tarantula near a piscatchie hole, owls, some drunken soldiers, and a lizard about 3 ft. long.

Nov - 16, 1874. Monday.
After coffee this morning I, Charlie Uncle, Johnnie & Herman went fishing among the wharfs; we seen a little boy fall into the water & nearly drown, and some oven fall down a wharf between a chain and their necks nearly broken, but all right, and 1 fish caught. We fish a good deal now, without success. Mother getting cross.

Nov. 18. 1874. Wednesday.
Father & Frank came back from Cordoba at 9 P.M. this evening.

Nov. 25. 1874. Wednesday.
Father & Willie started for Parana in the steamer this afternoon. I & Frank & Billie go swimming a good deal now in the river, below the city. Weather – hot. They are building a dining room on to the kitchen.

Sunday - Dec. 6. 1874
Father and Willie and Mr. Mahrer went came home from Parana this morning. They had seen Churchmans, and say the country is very nice in Entre Rios. But Father & Mahrer were troubled a good deal by the Beeche Colarodas; little insects that crawl under your skin and die.

Tuesday, Dec. 8, 1874
Mother & Father went to Buenos Ayres in the steamer today. Present from Father 75¢ Bol.

Robert and Anne Marie Southam were murdered at Ea. Los Laureles (El Trebol, SFé), 1872.

Saturday, Dec. 12. 1874
I, Uncle, Mahrer, Johnnie & Herman went outside of the city this morning to see a murderer of an Englishman and daughter get shot: the military and l formed 3 sides of a large square while a brick wall the other. The murderer was made to sit down near the wall, and was shot 13 times by some soldiers, and was killed. Last Tuesday was a feast day, and the military exercised in the plaza. This afternoon we all were astonished by Mahrer saying he was going in the brig Blitz to Rio Janeiro, and then to the United States. The Blitz is going tomorrow morning early, so he has to be on board tonight. After supper we went with him to the wharf to see him & wife off. We had to wait until 8:30 P.M. and then he was in a boat to the ship. Good Bye Mr. Mahrer and Aunt. The weather is cool now, and very dusty.

Dec. 14. 1874. Monday.
Father and mother came back from Buenos Ayres after dinner and I rode on the cart with the trunk to the house. They bring a good many kitchen utensils etc.

Dec. 15, 1874. Tuesday.
I and Frank and Willie went hunting after the big lizzard up the river but couldn’t see him, but we seen a large tarantula which we drowned. Frank and Willie had their rifles along, and shot at a mark on the beach – It was very hot We seen a great many soldiers marching this afternoon – 3 or 4000

Dec. 16. 1874. Wednesday
After coffee I and Charley went a little ways up the river with our little poles and fished for minnies, and caught seven — After breakfast 10 A.M. after wiping the dishes, I and Charley and Johnnie & Herman went up the same place and fished again and together we caught 22 minnies. I went my feet in fishing so I went in swimming, & cleaned the fish. It was a very hot day

Dec. 17. 1874. Thursday.
Today was a feast day to celebrate the advent peace again. At about 10 A.M. we all went to the plaza to see the soldiers exercise. I and Frank walked around a little while, and then I went underneath the porch of the church and seen the soldiers exercise, shoot together and also heard the cannons in the square shoot so loud that windows were broken. I and Charley afterwards walked around —

Dec. 25 - Christmas.
Staid home today as it was windy Go swimming & fishing nearly every day.


Father bought 4 leagues of land of Carlos Vernet. Feb. 19. 1875. 5 leagues above the rail road. north west of Canada de Gomez.


Brought 500 head of Manzilla 5 leagues north $39½ Before carnival 1876. 2 days marcacion. I peolared.


July 30 - 1874. Thursday.
Latitude 34 ° 2´ N.
Longitude 121° 2´ W.
Run - 250 miles.

July 31 - 1874. Friday.
Latitude - 30° 25´ N.
Longitude - 118° 8´ W
Run - 261 miles

August, 1. 1874. Saturday.
Latitude - 27° 17´ N
Longitude - 115° 15´ W
Run - 246 miles.

August. 2. 1874. Sunday.
Latitude - 24° 06´ N
Longitude - 112° W
Run 260 miles.

August. 3. 1874. Monday
Latitude - 21° 32´ N.
Longitude - 108° 34´ W.
Run 244 miles.

August 4. 1874. Tuesday.
Latitude - 18° 54´ N.
Longitude - 104° 48´ W.
Run 265 miles.

August. 5. 1874. Wednesday.
Latitude 17° 05´ N.
Longitude 100° 46´ W.
Run 255 miles

August 6. 1874. Thursday.
Latitude - 97° 30´ 15° 23´ N
Longitude - 97° 30´ W
Run - 215 miles.

August 7. 1874. Friday.
Latitude 13° 38´ N
Longitude 93° 39´ W.
Run 247 miles

August. 8. 1874. Saturday.
Latitude - 11° 47´ N.
Longitude - 90° 19´ W.
Run - 225 miles.

August. 9. 1874. Sunday.
Latitude - 10° 03´ N.
Longitude - 87° 19´ W.
Run - 205 miles.

August. 10. 1874. Monday.
Latitude 7° 59´ N.
Longitude 79° 45´ W.
Run - 266 miles. 59 from Panama.

August 16. 1874. Sunday
Latitude 11° 57´ N.
Longitude 78° 1´ W.
Run 191 miles.

August 17. 1874 Monday.
Latitude - 15° 40´ N
Longitude - 76° 31´ W.
Run - 240 miles

August. 18. 1874. Tuesday.
Latitude 19° 20´ N.
Longitude - 74° 26´ W.
Run - 248 miles.

August. 19. 1874. Wednesday.
Latitude - 23° 52´ N.
Longitude - 74° 24´ W.
Run - 273 miles

Aug. 20. 1874. Thursday.
Latitude - 28° 36´ N.
Longitude - 74° 35´ W.
Run - 285 miles.

Aug. 21. 1874. Friday.
Latitude - 33° 06´ N.
Longitude - 74° 29´ W.
Run. 270 miles

Aug. 22. 1874 - Saturday.
Latitude 38° N.
Longitude 74° 10´ W
Run 296 miles. To New York ____

August 30. 1874 - Sunday.
Latitude 40° 41´ N.
Longitude - 68° 53´ W.
Run 227 miles in 18½ hrs.

August - 31 - 1874. Monday.
Latitude 41° 32´ N.
Longitude 62° 47´ W.
Run - 281 miles

Sept - 1 - 1874 - Tuesday.
Latitude - 42° 44´ N.
Longitude - 56° 17´ W.
Run - 298 miles.

Sept - 2- 1874 - Wednesday.
Latitude - 44° 56´ N.
Longitude - 50° 27´ W
Run - 285 miles

Sept. 3 - 1874. Thursday.
Latitude 47° 2´ N.
Longitude 44° 3´ W.
Run - 295 miles

Sept. 4. 1874. Friday.
Latitude 48° 32´ N.
Longitude 37° 26´ W.
Run 292 miles.

Sept. 5. 1874 Saturday
Latitude 49° 25´ N.
Longitude 29° 46´ W.
Run - 307 miles.

Sept. 6. 1874. Sunday.
Latitude 49° 54´ N.
Longitude 21° 52´ W.
Run - 308 miles.

Sept. 7. 1874. Monday.
Latitude 49° 56´ N.
Longitude 13° 42´ W.
Run - 315 miles.

Sept. 8. 1874. Tuesday.
Latitude 49° 50´ N.
Longitude 5° 38´ W.
Run 312. To Needles - 166 miles

Sept. 10 - 1874. - Thursday.
Latitude - 48° 48´ N.
Longitude - 5° 04´ W
Run - 197 miles. 197 miles

Sept - 11 - 1874. Friday.
Latitude - 45° 10´ N.
Longitude - 8° 51´ W.
Run - 268 miles.

Sept - 12 - 1874. Saturday
Latitude - 41° 3´ N.
Longitude - 9° 53´ W.
Run -         254 miles
To Lisbon - 147  "

Sept - 14 - 1874. Monday.
Lat. 35° 28´ N
Long. 11° 48´ W.
Run - 231 miles.

Sept 15 - Lat 31° 3´ N.
Long - 14° 33´ W.
Run - 300 miles.
To peak of Teneriffe. 169 miles.

Sept. 16 - 1874. Wednesday.
Latitude - 27° 1´ N.
Longitude - 17° 8´ W.
Run - 278 miles.

Sept - 17 - 1874 - Thursday.
Latitude 23° 11´ N
Longitude 19° 52´ W
Run - 273 miles

Sept - 18 - 1874 Friday.
Latitude 20° 27´ N.
Longitude 14° 33´ W.
Run - 231 miles.
To St. Vincent - 240 miles.

Sept - 20 - 1874. - Sunday.
Latitude - 13° 30´ N.
Longitude - 26° 29´ W.
Run - 221 miles.

Sept - 21 - Latitude 5° 57´ N.
Longitude  28° 54´ W.
Run - 297 miles

Sept - 22 - 1874 Tuesday.
Latitude 5° 8´ N
Longitude 28° 54´ W.
Run - 234 miles.

Sept - 23 - 1874 - Wednesday.
Latitude - 00° 48´ N.
Longitude 31° 3´ W.
Run - 288 miles.
To Moronho de Fernando 290

Sept - 24 - 1874. Thursday.
Latitude 3° 49´ S.
Longitude - 32° 43´ W.
Run - 294 miles
To Pernambuco - 280 miles.

Sept. 26 - 1874. Saturday -
Latitude - 10° 17´ S.
Longitude - 35° 26´ W
Run - 151 miles.
To Bahia - 254 miles.

Sept - 28 - 1874. Monday.
Latitude 16° 53´ S.
Longitude 38° 6´ W.
Run - 239 miles.

Sept - 29 - 1874 Tuesday.
Latitude 21° 14´ S.
Longitude 39° 47´ W.
Run - 280 miles.
To Rio Janeiro - 203 miles

Oct. - 30 - 1874. Saturday.
Latitude - 26° 9´ S.
Longitude - 45° 9´ W
Run - 227 miles.

Oct - 4 - 1874. Sunday.
Latitude 30° 33´ S.
Longitude 48° 35´ W.
Run - 319 miles.

Oct. 5 - 1874. Monday.
Latitude 34° 24´ S.
Longitude 53° 4´ W
Run - 324 miles.

Oct. 6 - 1874 Tuesday
Latitude 34° 47´ S.
Longitude 53° 59´ W.
Run - 50 miles. Foggy.
To Monte Video. 120 miles

Oct. 7 - 1874. Wednesday.
Latitude -
Longitude -
Run -
To Monte Video - about 35 miles

71 days 17½ hours -
14,695 miles travelled

 


© Peter Benitz (Benitz Family)